What Causes KP?

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causes of kpKeratosis pilaris (KP) bumps are usually white, sometimes red, and generally don’t itch or hurt. KP is often described as chicken bumps, chicken skin, or goose bumps, in characteristic areas of the body, particularly the outer-upper arms and thighs. Keratosis pilaris affects nearly 50-80 % of all adolescents and approximately 40 % of adults. Because it’s difficult to treat, Keratosis pilaris can be frustrating.

Research suggests that Keratosis pilaris results from the buildup of keratin– a hard protein that protects your skin from harmful substances and infection. The keratin forms a scaly plug that blocks the opening of the hair follicle. Usually many plugs form, causing patches of rough, bumpy skin. However, one theory is that surplus skin cells build up around individual hair follicles. The individual follicular bumps are often caused by a hair that is unable to reach the surface and becomes trapped beneath the keratin debris. Keratosis pilaris isn’t often serious and usually disappears by age 30. Keratosis pilaris (KP) has no widely described racial dominance . and it is commonly noted worldwide in persons of all races and both sexes are affected by keratosis pilaris (KP), but females may be affected more frequently than males.

Keratosis pilaris also occurs in otherwise healthy people. Dry skin tends to worsen this condition.In the meantime, prescription medications and self-care measures can improve the appearance of keratosis pilaris.

There is no laboratory test or skin test commonly used to diagnose keratosis pilaris. Instead, it’s typically diagnosed based on an examination of your skin and a review of your medical history. Your doctor will ask questions about your symptoms and signs.

Self-help measures won’t cure keratosis pilaris, but they can help improve the appearance of your skin. You may find these measures beneficial:. You can learn much more about successfully treating Keratosis Pilares right here.

Go easy on your skin. Vigorous scrubbing or removal of the plugs may irritate your skin and aggravate the condition.
Gently dry off. After washing or bathing, gently pat or blot your skin dry with a towel so that some moisture remains on the skin.
Use a moisturizing lotion or lubricating cream. While your skin is still moist from bathing, apply a moisturizer that contains lanolin (Lansinoh, Medela), petroleum jelly (Vaseline) or glycerin (Glysolid), ingredients that soothe dry skin and help trap moisture.
Try urea or lactic acid. Apply an over-the-counter product that contains urea (Nutraplus, Eucerin) or lactic acid (AmLactin, Lac-hydrin) twice daily. Both help remove extra keratin from the surface of the skin.
Use a humidifier. A portable home humidifier or one attached to your furnace will add moisture to the air inside your home.

Keratosis pilaris (KP) bumps are usually white, sometimes red, and generally don’t itch or hurt. Keratosis pilaris results from the buildup of keratin– a hard protein that protects your skin from harmful substances and infection. Keratosis pilaris isn’t often serious and usually disappears by age 30. Keratosis pilaris (KP) has no widely described racial predilection or predominance. There is no laboratory test or skin test commonly used to diagnose keratosis pilaris.

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